Landscape Design

Landscape design is an act of health care.

Through design, we can program landscapes to provide health-improving resources like food, water, exercise, education, inspiration, relaxation, and socialization. Furthermore, the way we design our landscapes impacts the health of wildlife, water, soil, and air. The landscape is a place where we connect to our bodies, to each other, and to the planet in a way that is not generally afforded by indoor spaces or from behind devices. Yes, the outdoors can present discomforts like harsh weather and aggravation from insects, but the negative impacts these conditions have on our ability to enjoy the landscape are simply design challenges.

Landscape design pays for itself through by attracting business and saving money.

Hiring a professional to design your landscape is an investment in upgrading the performance of that landscape. Beyond simply enhancing appearance, landscapes can be designed to improve your physical and mental health, expand your social life, provide resources for wildlife, manage stormwater and environmental pollution, attract business, provide opportunities for marketing, and (perhaps most appealing) save time and money. Additionally, these benefits are not mutually exclusive. The well-designed landscape provides these benefits while simultaneously achieving aesthetic goals.

 
Featured is a landscape design for the Arthur Residence in support of Brie Arthur’s book  The Foodscape Revolution . Edible plants are prioritized but cleverly interspersed among ornamental plants to transform a traditional suburban landscape into a veritable supermarket. Where applicable, conventional plants for screening or house foundations are replaced with edible plants to amplify the service potential of the landscape. Paths to neighbors are strategically placed to encourage social occasions, particularly for children in the neighborhood who relish the opportunity to garden. Much of the lawn has been replaced by edible plants, further amplifying the service potential of the landscape and dramatically reducing environmental damage by one of the most pollutive machines in existence: the lawnmower. The result is a landscape that is healthier for people and the planet.

Featured is a landscape design for the Arthur Residence in support of Brie Arthur’s book The Foodscape Revolution. Edible plants are prioritized but cleverly interspersed among ornamental plants to transform a traditional suburban landscape into a veritable supermarket. Where applicable, conventional plants for screening or house foundations are replaced with edible plants to amplify the service potential of the landscape. Paths to neighbors are strategically placed to encourage social occasions, particularly for children in the neighborhood who relish the opportunity to garden. Much of the lawn has been replaced by edible plants, further amplifying the service potential of the landscape and dramatically reducing environmental damage by one of the most pollutive machines in existence: the lawnmower. The result is a landscape that is healthier for people and the planet.

Landscape design identifies client aspirations, prioritizes elements that support those goals, evaluates a client’s capacity to maintain those elements, and strategically assembles those elements to suit both budget and maintenance capacity while simultaneously supporting environmental service and aesthetic goals.

Following are examples of work I’ve developed with commercial and residential clients. Services for these clients include:

• Consultations and landscape troubleshooting

• Landscape design and drawing

• Promotional drawings for securing funding

• Mapping services

 

Landscape challenges vary, and so can the approach a designer takes in developing solutions. Challenges which are less-complex may be resolved through consultations, where drawings and instructions can be carried out by the owner or a landscape development professional. Spending time on site yields the best results, but research and technology allow designers to develop some solutions without leaving the office.

Landscape plans are most often associated with landscape design services and are appropriate for projects with a scale or complexity that consultations alone cannot resolve. The development of a landscape plan or plan package follows a process where ideas develop incrementally, and among multiple stages of approval from the client until the designer has suitably translated the client’s aspirations into a document that is ready for construction.

Featured above is a residential landscape plan with a modern style where original plant selections failed to adapt to soil and irrigation conditions and the increasing shade pressure from surrounding trees. The revision seeks to not only install plants that are more appropriate for site conditions, but also integrates more activity into the landscape through elements such as beehives, compost receptacles, and raised vegetable beds.

Featured above is a residential landscape plan with a modern style where original plant selections failed to adapt to soil and irrigation conditions and the increasing shade pressure from surrounding trees. The revision seeks to not only install plants that are more appropriate for site conditions, but also integrates more activity into the landscape through elements such as beehives, compost receptacles, and raised vegetable beds.

Residential landscape plan seeking to maximize opportunities for outdoor lounging where impervious surface limitations prevent the development of a hard-surfaced or gravel patio. Edible plants are interwoven into the design to allow for browsing while pollinator and bird-friendly plants ensure the space is popular with client-targeted species of wildlife.

Residential landscape plan seeking to maximize opportunities for outdoor lounging where impervious surface limitations prevent the development of a hard-surfaced or gravel patio. Edible plants are interwoven into the design to allow for browsing while pollinator and bird-friendly plants ensure the space is popular with client-targeted species of wildlife.

Supplemental services, such as phasing and management plans, can be designed to promote project feasibility and success. Phasing plans help clients meet project goals when budgets may not support the installation of the design in one event, and maintenance plans ensure the landscape meets performance goals long after construction is complete.

Featured above is a residential landscape design seeking to create a social space in the front yard to provide opportunities for neighbor engagement and to challenge the convention that recreation is more appropriate for the backyard. Edible plants mingle with historically native, pollinator and bird-friendly plants to bring neighbors of many species to the landscape. Boulders create opportunities for sitting and chatting with folks on the sidewalk, and the use of gravel instead of turf creates a significantly less expensive and more straightforward landscape to manage.

Featured above is a residential landscape design seeking to create a social space in the front yard to provide opportunities for neighbor engagement and to challenge the convention that recreation is more appropriate for the backyard. Edible plants mingle with historically native, pollinator and bird-friendly plants to bring neighbors of many species to the landscape. Boulders create opportunities for sitting and chatting with folks on the sidewalk, and the use of gravel instead of turf creates a significantly less expensive and more straightforward landscape to manage.

Featured above is a landscape design for the North Carolina Forestry Association headquarters featuring trees, shrubs, grasses and herbaceous perennials historically native to the state. This didactic landscape is arranged from mountain to sea and serves nearby schools as a living classroom. The trees specified in the design are to be cut down and replanted every eight years to demonstrate forestry techniques.

Featured above is a landscape design for the North Carolina Forestry Association headquarters featuring trees, shrubs, grasses and herbaceous perennials historically native to the state. This didactic landscape is arranged from mountain to sea and serves nearby schools as a living classroom. The trees specified in the design are to be cut down and replanted every eight years to demonstrate forestry techniques.

Featured above is a landscape design for New York University’s Carlyle Court where lawn and conventional plants are replaced with herbs and fruit-bearing shrubs and trees to create a unique recreation experience for students living in the surrounding building.

Featured above is a landscape design for New York University’s Carlyle Court where lawn and conventional plants are replaced with herbs and fruit-bearing shrubs and trees to create a unique recreation experience for students living in the surrounding building.

Using GIS data, historical accounts, and aerial photography 40+ years of development of Mountain Gardens, one of the nation’s most diverse collections of medicinal plants, is recorded for posterity. The image created through this documentation serves as a way-finding map for guests and planning purposes by Mountain Gardens staff and interns.

Using GIS data, historical accounts, and aerial photography 40+ years of development of Mountain Gardens, one of the nation’s most diverse collections of medicinal plants, is recorded for posterity. The image created through this documentation serves as a way-finding map for guests and planning purposes by Mountain Gardens staff and interns.